I also see New Mexico as my natural home and visited as a child. I love it there and if I could have it my way I would be there now. <3 but i am grateful for Texas and I appreciate it and I am very lucky to have come and lived here and experienced the things I have here.

Anonymous asked:

where are u from?

I have lived in Texas most of my life and it is where I now reside. I lived in Illinois for some months and Washington state for some months and I was born in New Mexico. 

tlapalizquixochtzin
thinkmexican:

In Honor of Cuauhtemoctzin (February 23, 1502 – February 28, 1525)
The Story of Resistance and Memory
Cuauhtemoc, which means “One that descends like an eagle,” was 18 years old when he became Tlatoani of Tenochtitlan in 1520. Captured on August 13, 1521, he was held captive three and a half years before being executed on February 28, 1525 by Hernán Cortés.
Concerned with insurrection, Cortés traveled with Cuauhtemoc and other leaders on expeditions throughout what is now Guatemala and Honduras. Based on historical accounts, Cortés ordered Cuauhtemoc’s executed for allegedly plotting to kill him and other Spaniards.
Resistance to the Spanish Invasion was complicated by a smallpox epidemic that decimated 40% of the city’s population.
According to oral tradition, Cuauhtemoc’s remains were taken to Ixcatopean, Guerrero, the place of his birth soon after his execution. As stated in this account, his remains were buried underneath a Catholic Church (shown above) built atop an Indigenous temple and ceremonial site in Ixcateopan. Spanish records corroborate these accounts.
In 1949, Ixcateopan’s town doctor, Salvador Rodríguez Juárez, presented documents to Church elders detailing the exact location of Cuauhtemoc’s burial site. These documents were said to have been passed down in Dr. Rodríguez’s family for over 400 years. Soon after, Mexico’s anthropological bureau, INAH, travelled to confirm the authenticity of his claims. The discovery of Cuauhtemoc’s tomb was officially announced on September 26, 1949.
There are some scholars and historians who have discredited this story as the government’s attempt to promote Mexican nationalism.
The Ixcateopan Church, which was originally a temple, is now a monument to Cuauhtemoc. It attracts thousands of visitors every year. Hundreds of Aztec Dancers travel to there every year to commemorate his birthday.
Read More About Cuauhtemoc
This is an updated version of a previous post. Read it here.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

thinkmexican:

In Honor of Cuauhtemoctzin (February 23, 1502 – February 28, 1525)

The Story of Resistance and Memory

Cuauhtemoc, which means “One that descends like an eagle,” was 18 years old when he became Tlatoani of Tenochtitlan in 1520. Captured on August 13, 1521, he was held captive three and a half years before being executed on February 28, 1525 by Hernán Cortés.

Concerned with insurrection, Cortés traveled with Cuauhtemoc and other leaders on expeditions throughout what is now Guatemala and Honduras. Based on historical accounts, Cortés ordered Cuauhtemoc’s executed for allegedly plotting to kill him and other Spaniards.

Resistance to the Spanish Invasion was complicated by a smallpox epidemic that decimated 40% of the city’s population.

According to oral tradition, Cuauhtemoc’s remains were taken to Ixcatopean, Guerrero, the place of his birth soon after his execution. As stated in this account, his remains were buried underneath a Catholic Church (shown above) built atop an Indigenous temple and ceremonial site in Ixcateopan. Spanish records corroborate these accounts.

In 1949, Ixcateopan’s town doctor, Salvador Rodríguez Juárez, presented documents to Church elders detailing the exact location of Cuauhtemoc’s burial site. These documents were said to have been passed down in Dr. Rodríguez’s family for over 400 years. Soon after, Mexico’s anthropological bureau, INAH, travelled to confirm the authenticity of his claims. The discovery of Cuauhtemoc’s tomb was officially announced on September 26, 1949.

There are some scholars and historians who have discredited this story as the government’s attempt to promote Mexican nationalism.

The Ixcateopan Church, which was originally a temple, is now a monument to Cuauhtemoc. It attracts thousands of visitors every year. Hundreds of Aztec Dancers travel to there every year to commemorate his birthday.

Read More About Cuauhtemoc

This is an updated version of a previous post. Read it here.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

tlapalizquixochtzin

tirairgid:

17th century book with embroidered cloth binding 

This beautiful binding is among the best preserved and most
splendid of its kind.The floral motifs are embroidered with satin
stitching in silver and luminous colours. The edges are lavishly
decorated, painted in gold and other colours and with gauffering.
The front edge shows the symbol of hope, a woman with an anchor.
 The volume may have belonged to Hedvig Eleonora as there
is a printed dedication to her in one of the works bound together.

National Library of Sweden- (x)
tlapalizquixochtzin
thinkmexican:

In Honor of Cuauhtemoctzin (February 23, 1502 – February 28, 1525)
The Story of Resistance and Memory
Cuauhtemoc, which means “One that descends like an eagle,” was 18 years old when he became Tlatoani of Tenochtitlan in 1520. Captured on August 13, 1521, he was held captive three and a half years before being executed on February 28, 1525 by Hernán Cortés.
Concerned with insurrection, Cortés traveled with Cuauhtemoc and other leaders on expeditions throughout what is now Guatemala and Honduras. Based on historical accounts, Cortés ordered Cuauhtemoc’s executed for allegedly plotting to kill him and other Spaniards.
Resistance to the Spanish Invasion was complicated by a smallpox epidemic that decimated 40% of the city’s population.
According to oral tradition, Cuauhtemoc’s remains were taken to Ixcatopean, Guerrero, the place of his birth soon after his execution. As stated in this account, his remains were buried underneath a Catholic Church (shown above) built atop an Indigenous temple and ceremonial site in Ixcateopan. Spanish records corroborate these accounts.
In 1949, Ixcateopan’s town doctor, Salvador Rodríguez Juárez, presented documents to Church elders detailing the exact location of Cuauhtemoc’s burial site. These documents were said to have been passed down in Dr. Rodríguez’s family for over 400 years. Soon after, Mexico’s anthropological bureau, INAH, travelled to confirm the authenticity of his claims. The discovery of Cuauhtemoc’s tomb was officially announced on September 26, 1949.
There are some scholars and historians who have discredited this story as the government’s attempt to promote Mexican nationalism.
The Ixcateopan Church, which was originally a temple, is now a monument to Cuauhtemoc. It attracts thousands of visitors every year. Hundreds of Aztec Dancers travel to there every year to commemorate his birthday.
Read More About Cuauhtemoc
This is an updated version of a previous post. Read it here.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

thinkmexican:

In Honor of Cuauhtemoctzin (February 23, 1502 – February 28, 1525)

The Story of Resistance and Memory

Cuauhtemoc, which means “One that descends like an eagle,” was 18 years old when he became Tlatoani of Tenochtitlan in 1520. Captured on August 13, 1521, he was held captive three and a half years before being executed on February 28, 1525 by Hernán Cortés.

Concerned with insurrection, Cortés traveled with Cuauhtemoc and other leaders on expeditions throughout what is now Guatemala and Honduras. Based on historical accounts, Cortés ordered Cuauhtemoc’s executed for allegedly plotting to kill him and other Spaniards.

Resistance to the Spanish Invasion was complicated by a smallpox epidemic that decimated 40% of the city’s population.

According to oral tradition, Cuauhtemoc’s remains were taken to Ixcatopean, Guerrero, the place of his birth soon after his execution. As stated in this account, his remains were buried underneath a Catholic Church (shown above) built atop an Indigenous temple and ceremonial site in Ixcateopan. Spanish records corroborate these accounts.

In 1949, Ixcateopan’s town doctor, Salvador Rodríguez Juárez, presented documents to Church elders detailing the exact location of Cuauhtemoc’s burial site. These documents were said to have been passed down in Dr. Rodríguez’s family for over 400 years. Soon after, Mexico’s anthropological bureau, INAH, travelled to confirm the authenticity of his claims. The discovery of Cuauhtemoc’s tomb was officially announced on September 26, 1949.

There are some scholars and historians who have discredited this story as the government’s attempt to promote Mexican nationalism.

The Ixcateopan Church, which was originally a temple, is now a monument to Cuauhtemoc. It attracts thousands of visitors every year. Hundreds of Aztec Dancers travel to there every year to commemorate his birthday.

Read More About Cuauhtemoc

This is an updated version of a previous post. Read it here.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

tlapalizquixochtzin
mughalshit:

bobthemole:

mughalshit:

European Woman in Mughal Dress
India, possibly Mughal, 19th century
Gouache

The text surrounding the portrait is in Urdu and refers to an incident which, if factual, would have occurred some time between 1748 and 1753. My translation follows:
Special Portrait
Mubarak Begum, First Wife of King Ahmad Shah
Brief Account
When Ahmad Shah sat upon the throne of the Mughal Empire, he too indulged in decadence like his late father Muhammad Shah Rangeelay. One day Mian Safdarjung, the Wazir of the realm, invited Ahmad Shah to a feast in honor of his sons’ circumcision. The provisions were lavish. Servant-girls stood by respectfully. The king declined to dine among the public and instead feasted within the harem where the hostess was Safdarjang’s lady-wife. When the adorned servant-girls stood facing the king in rows, the dining king’s glance fell upon the servant-girl Mubarak and he immediately became enamored. Soon after, Ahmad Shah queried Safdarjung’s lady-wife, “This servant-girl is very beautiful, how did you come by her?” As this servant-girl was a favorite of Safdarjung, Lady Safdar felt it was prudent to remain silent but the repeated questions of the king obliged her to respond. 
Thus the lady called the servant-girl and said, “The Lord King, the Shadow of God’s Grace, desires to speak to thee. Come forth respectfully and answer.” 
Hence Mubarak came forward in a composed manner and sat by and answered Ahmad Shah’s question thus, “Lord, my name is Mubarak and I am from Koh-e-Qaaf.” 
Ahmad Shah startled and said, “Koh-e-Qaf is where fairies live, how would man survive there?” 
Mubarak responded, “Lord, men live there too.” 
The king said, “I have doubts about your humanity.” 
Lady Safdar said, “Even I will attest that Mubarak is human and not some demon or fairy.” 
Ahmad Shah spoke with her and his infatuation increased. But Lady Safdar, apprehensive of her husband, remained completely silent. 
After dining the king left for his palace and Ahmad Shah made many efforts to make Mubarak his wife but his Wazir Safdarjung would not be convinced. Eventually the king insisted so much that Safdarjung was persuaded and turned Mubarak over to Ahmad Shah. 
The day Mubarak came to Ahmad Shah’s palace, Ahmad Shah was so delighted it was as if he had won seven realms. But by his ill-fortune, the lady fell ill with epilepsy the same day, a condition of which Safdarjung had not been aware. A few days after the wedding an epileptic attack occurred and Mubarak fell to the ground. When Ahmad Shah became aware of this, he immediately returned to the palace. On seeing Mubarak’s state he became frightened. Under the advice of the head eunuch he became convinced that she was under the shade of some fairy, and from then onward he began to hate the sight of the innocent invalid.
After the recent Tumblr conversations (especially via @medievalpoc) on western narratives about people of color, I thought it would be interesting to share this non-European narrative about a woman of possible European origin.
Note that if this portrait is indeed from the 19th century, it cannot be a live portrait of Mubarak. That raises interesting questions about who the sitter is and who commissioned it.

Thank you so much for your translation!

mughalshit:

bobthemole:

mughalshit:

European Woman in Mughal Dress

India, possibly Mughal, 19th century

Gouache

The text surrounding the portrait is in Urdu and refers to an incident which, if factual, would have occurred some time between 1748 and 1753. My translation follows:

Special Portrait

Mubarak Begum, First Wife of King Ahmad Shah

Brief Account

When Ahmad Shah sat upon the throne of the Mughal Empire, he too indulged in decadence like his late father Muhammad Shah Rangeelay. One day Mian Safdarjung, the Wazir of the realm, invited Ahmad Shah to a feast in honor of his sons’ circumcision. The provisions were lavish. Servant-girls stood by respectfully. The king declined to dine among the public and instead feasted within the harem where the hostess was Safdarjang’s lady-wife. When the adorned servant-girls stood facing the king in rows, the dining king’s glance fell upon the servant-girl Mubarak and he immediately became enamored. Soon after, Ahmad Shah queried Safdarjung’s lady-wife, “This servant-girl is very beautiful, how did you come by her?” As this servant-girl was a favorite of Safdarjung, Lady Safdar felt it was prudent to remain silent but the repeated questions of the king obliged her to respond.

Thus the lady called the servant-girl and said, “The Lord King, the Shadow of God’s Grace, desires to speak to thee. Come forth respectfully and answer.”

Hence Mubarak came forward in a composed manner and sat by and answered Ahmad Shah’s question thus, “Lord, my name is Mubarak and I am from Koh-e-Qaaf.”

Ahmad Shah startled and said, “Koh-e-Qaf is where fairies live, how would man survive there?”

Mubarak responded, “Lord, men live there too.”

The king said, “I have doubts about your humanity.”

Lady Safdar said, “Even I will attest that Mubarak is human and not some demon or fairy.”

Ahmad Shah spoke with her and his infatuation increased. But Lady Safdar, apprehensive of her husband, remained completely silent.

After dining the king left for his palace and Ahmad Shah made many efforts to make Mubarak his wife but his Wazir Safdarjung would not be convinced. Eventually the king insisted so much that Safdarjung was persuaded and turned Mubarak over to Ahmad Shah.

The day Mubarak came to Ahmad Shah’s palace, Ahmad Shah was so delighted it was as if he had won seven realms. But by his ill-fortune, the lady fell ill with epilepsy the same day, a condition of which Safdarjung had not been aware. A few days after the wedding an epileptic attack occurred and Mubarak fell to the ground. When Ahmad Shah became aware of this, he immediately returned to the palace. On seeing Mubarak’s state he became frightened. Under the advice of the head eunuch he became convinced that she was under the shade of some fairy, and from then onward he began to hate the sight of the innocent invalid.

After the recent Tumblr conversations (especially via @medievalpoc) on western narratives about people of color, I thought it would be interesting to share this non-European narrative about a woman of possible European origin.

Note that if this portrait is indeed from the 19th century, it cannot be a live portrait of Mubarak. That raises interesting questions about who the sitter is and who commissioned it.

Thank you so much for your translation!